Month: March 2021

Resources for LGBTQ high school student-athletes

Photo by: Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty ImagesIf you’re an LGBTQ high school student-athlete, check out these resources designed to offer you support. These resources have been curated by Micah Porter, an educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate, in conjunction with the Sports Equality Foundation and Outsports.
While LGBTQ acceptance in sports may be widespread and growing all the time, it can still be hard coming out. So many different dynamics to work through, with teammates, coaches, friends, parents, other family and everyone else in between.
How should I come out to people? What’s the right time to do it? Are there right ways or wrong ways to share who I am with someone?
These are all questions that LGBTQ youth struggle with every day. And to answer those questions: There isn’t one way to come out to anyone. Whether you open up to someone, or how you share with them, are individual choices and that choice is totally up to you.
Beyond coming out is being out. Coming out is a moment or a series of moments, but being out can be a lifetime. Navigating the sports world and your own personal life and professional life can take some thought. Who are you? Who do you want to be? How do you want to show up in life?
We hope some of these resources can help you answer any of these questions that might be swirling in your head. And be sure to check out our curated video collection that features LGBTQ people talking about how they’re living their lives coming out and being out.
“Coming Out” – Handbook for LGBTQ Young PeopleThis handbook by The Trevor Project is intended to help navigate questions around personal identity. It explores individual identity, thoughts on sharing one’s identity with others, and provides tools and guiding questions to help with what “coming out” means to every person.
LGBTQ+ & Athletics Teen ToolkitHere you will find a list of updated and ongoing LGBTQ+ resources for educators, coaches, school administrators, parents, and the community compiled by public school educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate Micah Porter. Micah has been a public school educator, teacher, coach, Athletic Director, and Principal for three decades.
GLSEN’s “Changing the Game” ProjectChanging the Game: The GLSEN Sports Project centers the development, implementation, and expansion of inclusive curriculum and sports for LGBTQ+ students and educators. Laying the groundwork with partners invested in supporting LGBTQ+ students, Changing the Game is the leading program in supporting LGBTQ+ students in P.E. classes and sports in K-12 schools.
Human Rights Campaign’s Resource Guide for Coming OutThis guide was designed by the Human Rights Campaign to help individuals through that process of coming out in realistic and practical terms. It acknowledges that the experience of coming out and living openly covers the full spectrum of human emotion — from fear to euphoria. HRC hopes this guide helps meet the challenges and opportunities that living openly offers.
StorytellingHere are some sites that contain personal experiences and challenges that others in the LGBTQ+ community have shared. These sites contain meaningful examples as to how others have overcome the many obstacles in order to thrive in today’s society.
I’m from Driftwood
Outsports’ Coming Out Stories
When I Came Out

Everyone is Gay
Find an Advocate – connect with a K-12 LGBTQ+ sports advocate for support If you want to connect with someone in K-12 sports for support, please fill out the below contact form (or click here) and someone from the Sports Equality Foundation will get in touch with you. Outsports – All Posts Read More

Get connected and get involved with the LGBTQ sports community

LGBTQ athletes, coaches, administrators and others in sports marched together in the Los Angeles Pride Parade in 2019. | InstagramThere are many ways LGBTQ athletes and coaches can get connected and involved with this vibrant community. These resources have been curated by Micah Porter, an educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate, in conjunction with the Sports Equality Foundation and Outsports.
Many LGBTQ athletes and coaches have a strong desire to connect with other LGBTQ people in sports, either before or after they start their coming-out journey.
Building networks of people in sports has been a main focus of both Outsports and the Sports Equality Foundation.
Here are some ways you can connect, get involved and build your own network of support within the LGBTQ sports community.
Share your story on OutsportsOutsports has told the coming-out and being-out stories of around 1,000 different LGBTQ people in sports over its 20+ years of publication. Every story helps inspire others to be their true selves, and everyone who shares their stories connects with others. As we say at Outsports, #CourageIsContagious.
Create a video of your journeyWhatever your journey looks like, you can create a video or series of videos on Instagram, YouTube, TikTok or wherever you choose. People get inspired hearing the journeys of others, and video is a great way to connect.
LGBTQ sports social-media communityThere are various ways to follow and connect with LGBTQ people across sports, namely through the networks built by Outsports and the Sports Equality Foundation.
Outsports
Instagram
Facebook
Twitter
Sports Equality Foundation
TikTok
Instagram
Facebook
Find an Advocate – connect with a K-12 LGBTQ+ sports advocate for advocacy and connectionIf you want to connect with someone in K-12 sports for support, or to get involved with advocacy, please fill out the below contact form (or click here) and someone from the Sports Equality Foundation will get in touch with you. Outsports – All Posts Read More

Trans inclusion resources for high school sports

Mack Beggs is a two-time Texas state wrestling champion. | Photo by Leslie Plaza Johnson/Icon Sportswire via Getty ImagesThere are various resources for people who are trans, or who support trans athletes, to find encouragement and build community. These resources have been curated by Micah Porter, an educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate, in conjunction with the Sports Equality Foundation and Outsports.
How to best provide athletic opportunities for trans student-athletes is one of the hottest topics in the United States today, and that isn’t going to change any time soon.
At the heart of it all is the welfare of trans youth. As various statewide policies have opened up opportunities for trans athletes to participate on high school teams of their gender, many have opted to join teammates in running, swimming, kicking, shooting and every other activity central to the student-athlete experience.
As policies continue to shift and evolve, we’ve put together a list of resources for coaches and administrators to understand the issues involving trans athletes, things to consider, and ways to better understand the experiences of trans athletes and their teammates and opponents.
GLSEN’s “On The Team: Equal Opportunity For Transgender Student Athletes”The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to high school and collegiate athletic programs about how to ensure transgender student athletes fair, respectful, and legal access to school sports teams. Specific best practice recommendations are provided for athletic administrators, coaches, student athletes, parents, and the media.
TransAthlete.comTransathlete.com is a resource for students, athletes, coaches, and administrators to find information about trans inclusion in athletics at various levels of play. This site pulls together existing information in one central location, and breaks down information into easy-to-reference areas to help find the resources needed.
Center for American Progress, Fair Play: The Importance of Sports Participation for Transgender YouthThis 2021 comprehensive report outlines the critical importance of trans inclusion for youth in sports and highlights the assault on trans rights in K-12 sports participation. This report highlights numerous well-being, educational, and social benefits sports can confer, while ignoring the reality that transgender women and girls are women and girls, and transgender men and boys are men and boys.
Outsports series on trans-athlete inclusionOutsports was nominated for a GLAAD Award for this series exploring the realities of trans athletes at various levels of sports.
Find an Advocate – connect with a K-12 trans sports advocateIf you want to connect with someone in K-12 sports who is trans, or who supports trans athletes, please fill out the below contact form (or click here) and someone from the Sports Equality Foundation will get in touch with you. Outsports – All Posts Read More

Inspiring videos of athletes and others coming out and being out in sports and in life

Michael Sam coming out publicly in 2014 inspired many others to be their true selves with their family and friends. | Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty ImagesSeeing and hearing the coming-out stories of LGBTQ young people can be inspiring and informing. Here’s our collection. These resources have been curated by Micah Porter, an educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate, in conjunction with the Sports Equality Foundation and Outsports.
When people share their coming-out stories, they inspire others to do the same. Outsports’ motto — Courage Is Contagious — is about just that.
It came from hearing from so many young people about how they were empowered by the stories of others. When athletes are able to actually watch and listen as an athlete comes out or talks about their coming-out experience, it’s even more powerful.
Some young LGBTQ athletes with the Sports Equality Foundation have put together a playlist of these very videos, all of which have inspired one of them to be their true selves.
Check them out below.
If there’s a sports coming-out video that inspired you that you don’t see here, or if you’ve made a video yourself, please leave it on the comments so we can share with others.
Coming-out videos from LGBTQ athletes

Coming-out videos from non-athletes Outsports – All Posts Read More

Check out these LGBTQ student-athlete scholarship opportunities

Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty ImagesVarious organizations give out scholarships to LGBTQ students and student-athletes. These resources have been curated by Micah Porter, an educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate, in conjunction with the Sports Equality Foundation and Outsports.
More and more opportunities for scholarships for LGBTQ students and student-athletes are popping up all the time. They can offer financial assistance and guidance to help you find your path to a college education.
These scholarships don’t place heavy weight on your excellence on the field, court, track or ice. Instead, they often place extra value on how you are giving back to your community, how you are improving the lives of other LGBTQ people, or your academic excellence.
So even if you’re not a star athlete, people want to help.
Please note that if you are going to play a sport at an NCAA institution, you should check with your coach or Sports Information Director before accepting any scholarship in relation to your participation in athletics. Policies at the NCAA are shifting in regard to these kinds of scholarships, particularly in relation to areas of diversity and inclusion. And it’s best to be on the safe side to ensure your continued eligibility to participate and compete.
If you have no intention of competing in NCAA sports, there should be no issue in you accepting a scholarship for your high school participation.
Here are some organizations that offer scholarships to LGBTQ+ student-athletes:
Ryan O’Callaghan FoundationThe Ryan O’Callaghan Foundation (ROFDN) exists to provide scholarships, support and mentorship for LGBTQ+ athletes, students and youth. O’Callaghan played football at Cal and in the NFL.
FLAG Flag Football in BostonThe Marc E. Lewis Youth Scholarship is presented annually to a graduating high school student who has made school and/or community sports programs safer for, and more inclusive of, LGBTQ student-athletes, as either a role model or ally.
Team DCTeam DC supports local LGBTQ-identified student-athletes by awarding scholarships to support these impressive leaders as they continue their academic careers.
Ramblers Scholarship for LGBTQI AthletesThe Ramblers, an LGBTQ soccer organization in New York, gives out a scholarship that supports student athletes pursuing an undergraduate education in the U.S. who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or intersex (LGBTQI), or who are demonstrated and committed allies to this community.
US Lacrosse LGBTQ+ Inclusion ScholarshipUS Lacrosse is now accepting nominations for two LGBTQ+ Inclusion Scholarships aimed at providing financial support to student-athletes who demonstrate positive sensitivity to and involvement in LGBTQ+ issues.
NLGJA Steve Mason Sports Media ScholarshipApplicants must be planning to pursue a career in journalism and be able to demonstrate their passion and commitment to sports journalism as a profession.
Here are some organizations that offer non-sports related scholarships to LGBTQ+ students, whether they are in sports or not:
Point FoundationPoint Foundation offers scholarship opportunities for LGBTQ students based on various criteria, including: A proven track record of leadership and community involvement, strong academic achievement, working for the betterment of the LGBTQ community and financial need.
Stonewall Foundation ScholarshipsFor nearly 15 years, Stonewall Foundation has partnered with donors to create scholarships that provide unique opportunities and access to education, both in New York City and throughout the country.
Human Rights Campaign list of scholarshipsHRC provides a list of scholarships, fellowships and grants for LGBTQ and allied students at both the undergraduate and graduate-level. Outsports – All Posts Read More

Resources for parents who have LGBTQ children

Photo credit should read LUIS ROBAYO/AFP via Getty ImagesFor some parents, navigating a course for the family with an LGBTQ child can take some care and resources. These resources have been curated by Micah Porter, an educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate, in conjunction with the Sports Equality Foundation and Outsports.
The coming-out experience can be incredibly scary for young LGBTQ people. Yet it can also be a daunting journey for the parents, guardians, and family members. Whether they’re supportive and understanding or scared and upset, parents and guardians are a huge part of the coming-out process. And they don’t always know where to turn.
Luckily, millions of parents across the United States and around the world have been on this journey. And much like young LGBTQ people love inspiring and educating one another, many of these parents want to help other parents who might just now be coming to this conversation.
If you are a parent or guardian who suspects their child might be LGBTQ, or whose child has come out to you, here are some resources that can help you navigate conversations and build support for your child.
Some of them are organizations designed to help, and others are specific resources and articles. If one doesn’t hit the mark for you, be sure to keep looking. You’ll find someone who can help you.
LGBTQ+ & Athletics Teen ToolkitHere you will find a list of updated and ongoing LGBTQ+ resources for educators, coaches, school administrators, parents, and the community compiled by public school educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate Micah Porter. Micah has been a public school educator, teacher, coach, Athletic Director, and Principal for three decades.
My Kid Is GayA first-of-its-kind digital presence, inclusive of videos, advice, and resources, dedicated exclusively toward helping parents understand their LGBTQ children. My Kid Is Gay sources voices from across the world to help answer the many questions that parents (and family members, and even teachers) have about the LGBTQ young people in their life.
PFLAG Reading List ResourcesThis reading and resource list from PFLAG is an excellent starting point in a family’s coming-out journey. Many of the titles listed cover the process both for those who are navigating a new lifetime of being out and proud, and their significant others, friends, families, and allies as well.
If I Have Gay Children: Four Promises from a Christian Pastor/Parent A personal blog to guide Christian families and parents as to how to best support LGBTQ+ children.
HealthyChildren.org Support Resources for Families of Gender Diverse Youth. Having a gender diverse child can be very stressful for parents and caregivers, as they deal with uncertainty and navigate schools, extended families, sibling relationships, and the world around them. There are several national and international organizations that support families with gender diverse children, as well as excellent books. Many parents and siblings also find it helpful to meet with a mental health care professional or other families in a support group setting.
GLSEN’s – “Game Plan for Parents”This is a research brief from GLSEN that provides basic guidance for parents as to how they can support LGBTQ student-athletes on their own, working with others, and leading change in culture and policies.
American Library AssociationThis is a list of resources, guides, community forums, and organizations to help families and parents as they support their LGBTQ+ children and family members. Counseling, mental health supports, educational materials and toolkits are some of the resources provided by the ALA.
Storytelling
Here are some sites and links that contain personal experiences and challenges that others in the LGBTQ+ community have shared. These sites contain meaningful examples as to how others have overcome the many obstacles in order to thrive in today’s society.
I’m from Driftwood
When I Came Out
Everyone is Gay
A Letter From One Dad to Another Outsports – All Posts Read More

LGBTQ-inclusion resources for athletic departments and coaches

Photo by John Greim/LightRocket via Getty ImagesAthletic departments and coaches can get ahead of LGBTQ inclusion conversations with some first steps. These resources have been curated by Micah Porter, an educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate, in conjunction with the Sports Equality Foundation and Outsports.
There are generally two ways athletic departments and coaches can address LGBTQ inclusion in their programs.
They can be reactionary, responding to events when they happen. This could be an athlete coming out to teammates, an opponent using anti-LGBTQ slurs directed at a player, or an athlete on the team saying something offensive to an LGBTQ student, teacher, fan or anyone else in and around the school.
The other option is to get ahead of these incidents. This entails proactively educating members of the team and making athletes, coaches and administrators aware of what may be offensive and how to build an athletic environment in which LGBTQ people feel included and welcome.
It should be no surprise which approach tends to yield better results.
Just like great game-planning, when anyone in sports gets ahead of a potential issue, the potential for success is far greater.
There are various resources to lean on when figuring out some steps you can take to build a better environment in sports. Don’t be intimidated: There’s a lot of information and a lot of things you can do. The important thing to consider is doing something, because something is better than nothing.
GLSEN’s – “Game Plan for Coaches”This is a research brief from GLSEN that provides basic guidance for coaches as to how they can support LGBTQ student-athletes on their own, working with others, and leading change in culture and policies.
Leading the Way: Working with LGBTQ Athletes and CoachesThis is a comprehensive resource designed for coaches and aims to make sport a more welcoming place for those who identify as LGBTQ+. Leading the Way provides information to help coaches understand LBGTQ-phobia and the negative impact it has on everyone in their sport. It suggests best practices for creating a sport environment that is safe and respectful for all.
LGBTQ+ & Athletics Teen ToolkitHere you will find a list of updated and ongoing LGBTQ+ resources for educators, coaches, school administrators, parents, and the community compiled by public school educator and LGBTQ+ sports advocate Micah Porter. Micah has been a public school educator, teacher, coach, Athletic Director, and Principal for three decades.
Find an Advocate – connect with a K-12 LGBTQ+ sports advocate for insightIf you want to connect with someone in K-12 sports for insight and support, or to get involved with inclusion advocacy, please fill out the below contact form (or click here) and someone from the Sports Equality Foundation will get in touch with you. Outsports – All Posts Read More

“Gym” Jordan, Accused Of Ignoring Sexual Abuse Of Wrestlers, Proclaims Gaetz’s Innocence Drawing Ridicule


Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) drew widespread ridicule online Wednesday after proclaiming that Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) was innocent of any allegations involving underage sex trafficking.

Jordan, who has long been one of Gaetz’s staunchest congressional allies, told CNN’s Ryan Nobles that “I believe Matt Gaetz” is innocent after it was revealed on Tuesday night that he’s being investigated by the Department of Justice for potentially having an inappropriate relationship with a 17-year-old.

The Ohio representative and former Ohio State University wrestling coach was accused last year by a former team captain of aiding and abetting in the university’s cover-up of sexual abuse within the program, during testimony before Ohio state legislator.

“Jim Jordan called me crying, groveling, begging me to go against my brother, begging me, crying for a half-hour,” DiSabato said Wednesday. “That’s the kind of cover-up that’s going on there.”

Adam DiSabato, captain of the team during the early 1990s, told members of the Ohio House Civil Justice Committee that Jordan and other officials ignored former Ohio State doctor Richard Strauss’s sexual abuse of wrestlers from 1979 to 1997. DiSabato said that Jordan and other team officials knew about open-shower facilities that facilitated sexual harassment and abuse of team wrestlers. Jordan has previously denied the allegation.

A university study found that Strauss abused at least 177 people during his tenure as the wrestling team’s doctor. Strauss was never charged and died by suicide in 2005.

A former Ohio State wrestler told the university’s lawyers in 2018 that, “Based on testimony from victim athletes from each of the aforementioned varsity sports, we estimate that Strauss sexually assaulted and/or raped a minimum of 1,500/2,000 athletes at OSU.”

Jordan’s statement declaring Gaetz’s innocence drew instant ridicule online, with many calling on

The post “Gym” Jordan, Accused Of Ignoring Sexual Abuse Of Wrestlers, Proclaims Gaetz’s Innocence Drawing Ridicule appeared first on The Gaily Grind.

Finally after pressure, Coke, Delta Condemn Voting Restrictions as ‘Unacceptable’ and Based on ‘Big Lie’. Too Little, Too Late?

coke delta condemn

Coke, Delta voting law

ATLANTA — The leaders of two of Georgia’s biggest corporations said Wednesday they staunchly opposed the state’s sweeping elections restrictions, reversing weeks of milder statements about the far-ranging new law pushed through the Legislature by Republican lawmakers. Delta Air Lines Chief Executive Ed Bastian said in a memo to employees that the law was “unacceptable” and “based on a lie” of widespread fraud in last November’s election. Hours later, Coca-Cola’s CEO also pronounced the measure “unacceptable.” The sharply worded statements came as Georgia companies face growing threats of boyco… Read More from The Atlanta Journal Constitution


Too little? Too Late? Sounds like they want to be able to say they opposed but fine with it. On the last day of the legislative session, after a bizarre statement last week in support of the legislation severely limiting voting rights, Delta likely needs to do better for this to not be considered too little, too late. Already the pissed off legislators have started to release that these corporations were saying something different privately last week. All that puts Delta — and Coke, another Atlanta employer — in the middle of an existential battle, looking to please both sides when there is no “neutral” and facts support only one.

It’s a huge leap forward to have the CEO specifically and strongly call out the Big Lie, but watching and waiting until now, it’s clear they would prefer it to disappear but with an ability to point to this “strong” language. There are many, many more big companies in Georgia including Home Depot, Porsche, UPS, Cox Media, Hansen Beverages, and many more. Most based in Atlanta with tens of thousands of employees each.

–MG


Read More Towleroad Gay News

Mike Pence is plotting his path to the presidency in 2024 & he might be able to pull it offMike Pence is plotting his path to the presidency in 2024 & he might be able to pull it off

ShutterstockBest known for his fierce opposition to LGBTQ rights, Pence is gathering support among religious right leaders and organizations to serve as the bulwark for his campaign. Read More LGBTQ Nation